Antibiotics may help make you fat, studies show

Could antibiotics make you fat?

Two studies this week suggest that using antibiotics may save people’s lives, but could also change their metabolisms. Put together, the studies suggest that taking antibiotics might alter digestion to help people absorb calories from food they normally would be unable to digest.

Every human carries pounds of microorganisms that we couldn’t live without. They break down food and extract nutrients like Vitamin K for us. Antibiotics will kill some of these beneficial organisms, which is why so many doctors now tell patients to eat yogurt after taking a course of the drugs, to replace some of the good guys.

“There is emerging evidence suggesting the importance of the microbes in our intestines and their role in absorbing food,” said Dr. Leonardo Trasande of New York University, who led one of the studies.

Read more: http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/08/22/13399483-antibiotics-may-help-make-you-fat-studies-show?lite

Study: Not all calories are created equal

Research shows only one out of six overweight people can maintain even 10 percent of any weight loss over the long term. Now a new study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, has found a possible explanation: all calories are not created equal.

After losing about 30 pounds weight, 21 young adult participants were put on three different diets to see how they affected metabolism: low fat, low carb and low glycemic index. While on the low fat diet, people burned fewer calories, making it harder to keep off weight. People on the low carb diet burned the most calories, but had increased risk of heart disease, while the low glycemic diet offered medium calorie burning, with little risk of negative effects. Researchers say diets that reduce a blood sugar surge after a meal, either low glycemic or low carb, may be preferable to low fat for those trying to achieve lasting weight loss. Read more: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505269_162-57461579/study-not-all-calories-are-created-equal/

Video

New Scientific Review of Low Carb Diets

All important risk factors for heart disease improves! Read more at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22905670

Systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials of the effects of low carbohydrate diets on cardiovascular risk factors.

SOURCE

Centro Hospitalar Vila Nova Gaia/Espinho, Gaia, Portugal Centro Hospitalar do Porto, Porto, Portugal Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade do Porto, Porto, Portugal Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

ABSTRACT

A systematic review and meta-analysis were carried out to study the effects of low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) on weight loss and cardiovascular risk factors (search performed on PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Scopus databases). A total of 23 reports, corresponding to 17 clinical investigations, were identified as meeting the pre-specified criteria. Meta-analysis carried out on data obtained in 1,141 obese patients, showed the LCD to be associated with significant decreases in body weight (-7.04 kg [95% CI -7.20/-6.88]), body mass index (-2.09 kg m(-2) [95% CI -2.15/-2.04]), abdominal circumference (-5.74 cm [95% CI -6.07/-5.41]), systolic blood pressure (-4.81 mm Hg [95% CI -5.33/-4.29]), diastolic blood pressure (-3.10 mm Hg [95% CI -3.45/-2.74]), plasma triglycerides (-29.71 mg dL(-1) [95% CI -31.99/-27.44]), fasting plasma glucose (-1.05 mg dL(-1) [95% CI -1.67/-0.44]), glycated haemoglobin (-0.21% [95% CI -0.24/-0.18]), plasma insulin (-2.24 micro IU mL(-1) [95% CI -2.65/-1.82]) and plasma C-reactive protein, as well as an increase in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (1.73 mg dL(-1) [95%CI 1.44/2.01]). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and creatinine did not change significantly, whereas limited data exist concerning plasma uric acid. LCD was shown to have favourable effects on body weight and major cardiovascular risk factors; however the effects on long-term health are unknown.

Read more at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22905670